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72 hours before Paris attacks, ISIS-linked social media account reveals 'God bless you in your mission'

By Catherine Herridge

 

ISIS claims of responsibility for Friday’s Paris massacre are being reviewed by US intelligence analysts Sunday morning, with a focus on the English-language version, which is delivered in American-accented English, Fox News has been told. It is now clear the plot included a rollout of ISIS propaganda, which was prepared in advance, including threats directed toward the Russian people, Rome, London and Washington DC.

Separately, Fox News has learned that four credible, ISIS-linked social media accounts began sharing messages 72 hours before the Paris attack, including images of weapons, the Eiffel tower, as well as blessings for the attackers’ mission. A military intelligence source says the social media traffic is now seen as evidence the three teams had gone operational.

The translations include “God bless you in your mission” and “Support the deployment,” as well as a reference to our “sister,” suggesting an operative, or member of the support team was a woman.

Meanwhile, FBI Director James Comey has told field offices across the country to intensify surveillance on ISIS suspects, hoping to prevent violence in this country. Before the attack, Comey confirmed there are 900 active ISIS investigations, spread over all 50 states.

There is a growing body of evidence, as reported by Fox Friday, that the attack was pre-meditated, and the terrorists vetted by ISIS in Syria. An anti-ISIS group told the Sunday Telegraph that two fighters were sent in March, and two more in May for an operation in France. In August, a French national who was arrested, returning from Syria, mentioned instructions to attack a concert hall.

 

Catherine Herridge is an award-winning Chief Intelligence correspondent for FOX News Channel (FNC) based in Washington, D.C. She covers intelligence, the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security. Herridge joined FNC in 1996 as a London-based correspondent.

French citizen Ismael Omar Mostefai ID'd as suicide bomber in Paris massacre

Three of the seven Islamist suicide bombers who perpetrated the terrorist massacre in Paris were French citizens, as was at least one of seven other people arrested in neighboring Belgium in connection to the deadly attacks that killed 129 and injured 352 on Friday night.

One suicide attacker, who was identified from a skin sample, had been living in a Paris suburb, French police said Sunday. A Belgian official said two of the seven suicide bombers were French men living in Brussels, and one of the attackers was living in the Molenbeek neighborhood, which is considered a focal point for religious extremism and fighters going to Syria. Among the seven people arrested was another French citizen living in the Belgian capital.

The new information highlighted growing fears of possible homegrown terrorism in France, a country that has exported more jihadis than any other in Europe.

Ismael Omar Mostefai, a 29-year-old French citizen who had been flagged for ties to Islamic radicalism, was identified Sunday as one of the assailants by a French judicial official who spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.

Mostefai's ID comes as Balkan authorities work to track the travels of a man whose Syrian passport was found next to a dead suicide bomber at France's national stadium on Friday night. It is still not clear if that Syrian passport is authentic, or if it belonged to the dead bomber. European officials say there is a brisk trade in fake Syrian passports to help people obtain refugee status in the European Union.

Serbian police said Sunday the owner of the passport, identified only as A.A., formally requested asylum in Serbia. Prosecutor Francois Molins told Sky News the passport was found at the Stade de France bombing site and belonged to a Syrian citizen born in 1990.

Officials said the passport holder entered Greece on Oct. 3 through Leros, one of the eastern Aegean islands that tens of thousand of people fleeing war and poverty have been using as a gateway into the 28-nation EU. Serbian police said the holder of the passport then registered at its border entry with Macedonia on Oct. 7. Croatian police said the passport holder was checked at a refugee center on Oct. 8, but the man was not flagged as suspicious and continued his journey toward Hungary and Austria, according to police spokeswoman Helena Biocic.

The FBI is sending to Paris a team of agents that specialize in recovering information from electronic devices, the New York Times reported on Sunday. The FBI is reportedly anticipating a bevy of information coming from French officials in the days ahead and wants to have sufficient manpower to handle and interpret it.

While investigators work to figure out how the attack was planned and if anyone connected with it is still at large, the so-called "City of Light" has gone dark as top Paris tourist attractions such as the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre art museum remain closed in the wake of the attacks perpetrated by Mostefai and seven other terrorists. The Islamist attackers wielded AK-47s and wore suicide belts while carrying out a series of coordinated attacks at six sites around Paris on Friday night.

Mostefai, identified by his fingerprints, was one of the terrorists inside the Bataclan concert hall, where at least 89 people were murdered during a concert by the American band Eagles of Death Metal, Sky News reported. He was known to the French Secret Service for his radicalism, Fox News has confirmed.

Little is known about Mostefai's background, but French investigators have learned he grew up in a tough French housing project and turned to radicalism five years ago.

The mayor of the French city of Chartres, Jean-Pierre Gorges, identified Mostefai as a resident in a Facebook post, and Molins told Sky News that Mostefai had a criminal record, but didn’t spend time in jail.

"In 2010, he was blacklisted by the police due to extreme behaviors, but never been classified into any illegal extremist groups," Molins said.

An unidentified prosecutor told AP Mostefai was identified from fingerprints on a finger found in the carnage of the Paris attacks Friday night.

A French citizen believed to be directly involved in Friday's Islamic terror attack in Paris that killed 129 and injured 352 was on the run Sunday afternoon and was being hunted by authorities, French security officials said.

 

French police issued a wanted notice for Salah Abdeslam, a 26-year-old man born in Brussels. (AP)

French police issued a wanted notice with a photo of Salah Abdeslam, a 26-year-old man born in Brussels. The notice, released Sunday, warns people who see him that he is dangerous, saying "do not intervene yourself."

 

The man, one of three brothers believed involved in the killings in central Paris, rented the black Volkswagen Polo used by a group of hostage-takers that left at least 89 people dead inside the Bataclan concert hall, one official said.

 

One other police official said the manhunt is believed to involve at least one suspect. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing. One of the suspect's brothers has been arrested in Belgium and another brother died in the attack, the first official said.

 

Three of the seven Islamist suicide bombers have already been identified as French citizens, as was at least one of seven other people arrested in neighboring Belgium in connection to the deadly attacks.

 

One suicide attacker, who was identified from a skin sample, had been living in a Paris suburb, French police said Sunday. A Belgian official said two of the seven suicide bombers were French men living in Brussels, and one of the attackers was living in the Molenbeek neighborhood, which is considered a focal point for religious extremism and fighters going to Syria. Among the seven people arrested was another French citizen living in the Belgian capital.

 

The new information highlighted growing fears of possible homegrown terrorism in France, a country that has exported more jihadis than any other in Europe.

 

Ismael Omar Mostefai, a 29-year-old French citizen who had been flagged for ties to Islamic radicalism, was identified Sunday as one of the assailants by a French judicial official who spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.

 

Mostefai's ID comes as Balkan authorities work to track the travels of a man whose Syrian passport was found next to a dead suicide bomber at France's national stadium on Friday night. It is still not clear if that Syrian passport is authentic, or if it belonged to the dead bomber. European officials say there is a brisk trade in fake Syrian passports to help people obtain refugee status in the European Union.

 

Serbian police said Sunday the owner of the passport, identified only as A.A., formally requested asylum in Serbia. Prosecutor Francois Molins told Sky News the passport was found at the Stade de France bombing site and belonged to a Syrian citizen born in 1990.

 

Officials said the passport holder entered Greece on Oct. 3 through Leros, one of the eastern Aegean islands that tens of thousand of people fleeing war and poverty have been using as a gateway into the 28-nation EU. Serbian police said the holder of the passport then registered at its border entry with Macedonia on Oct. 7. Croatian police said the passport holder was checked at a refugee center on Oct. 8, but the man was not flagged as suspicious and continued his journey toward Hungary and Austria, according to police spokeswoman Helena Biocic.

 

The FBI is sending to Paris a team of agents that specialize in recovering information from electronic devices, the New York Times reported on Sunday. The FBI is reportedly anticipating a bevy of information coming from French officials in the days ahead and wants to have sufficient manpower to handle and interpret it.

 

While investigators work to figure out how the attack was planned and if anyone connected with it is still at large, the so-called "City of Light" has gone dark as top Paris tourist attractions such as the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre art museum remain closed in the wake of the attacks perpetrated by Mostefai and seven other terrorists. The Islamist attackers wielded AK-47s and wore suicide belts while carrying out a series of coordinated attacks at six sites around Paris on Friday night.

 

Mostefai, identified by his fingerprints, was one of the terrorists inside the Bataclan concert hall, where at least 89 people were murdered during a concert by the American band Eagles of Death Metal, Sky News reported. He was known to the French Secret Service for his radicalism, Fox News has confirmed.

 

Little is known about Mostefai's background, but French investigators have learned he grew up in a tough French housing project and turned to radicalism five years ago.

 

The mayor of the French city of Chartres, Jean-Pierre Gorges, identified Mostefai as a resident in a Facebook post, and Molins told Sky News that Mostefai had a criminal record, but didn’t spend time in jail.

 

"In 2010, he was blacklisted by the police due to extreme behaviors, but never been classified into any illegal extremist groups," Molins said.

 

An unidentified prosecutor told AP Mostefai was identified from fingerprints on a finger found in the carnage of the Paris attacks Friday night.

 

"In 2010, he was blacklisted by the police due to extreme behaviors . . ."

 

- Prosecutor Francois Molins

The official said Mostefai’s father, a brother and other family members have been detained and are being questioned, according to the AP.

 

ISIS has claimed responsibility for the apparent meticulously planned attacks and has warned that France would remain at the “top of the list of targets” over its airstrike on the militant group in Syria and Iraq.

 

A Seat car containing Kalashnikov rifles was found abandoned by police in Montreuil, approximately 4 miles east of Paris. Molins said Saturday that gunmen armed with automatic rifles pulled up in that model car before opening fire, killing 15 people and injuring 10, but a French official told the AP that authorities couldn’t immediately confirm if it was the same black Seat car linked to the AK-47 attacks on the Le Carillon bar and the Le Petit Cambodge restaurant on Rue Alibert in the city’s 10th district.

 

Belgian police arrested three in connection with the terror assaults Saturday. Belgium Justice Minister Koen Geens told the VRT network that the arrests came after a car with Belgian license plates was seen Friday night close to the Bataclan concert hall, scene of the deadliest assault, where at least 89 people were massacred by attackers armed with AK-47s and explosives.

 

Geens said the car was a rental and the arrests stemmed from police raids conducted in the St. Jans Molenbeek neighborhood in Brussels.

 

French President Francois Hollande called the attacks an “act of war” in a nationally televised address Saturday. Hollande vowed France “will be merciless toward the barbarians of Islamic State group.”

 

ISIS, in an online statement, described Paris as "the carrier of the banner of the Cross in Europe" and described the attackers as "eight brothers wrapped in explosive belts and armed with machine rifles."

 

French police said Saturday they believed all of the attackers were dead, but were still searching for possible accomplices. The French prosecutor's office said seven of the eight assailants died in suicide bombings.

 

Fox News' Greg Palkot and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

TERROR

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Fourth of July terror warning issued by FBI, Homeland Security

 

 

 

 

Authorities have warned local law enforcement officials across the country about a heightened concern involving possible terror attacks targeting the July 4th holiday, a U.S. law enforcement official said.

 

While there was no specific or credible threat of attack, the official said the intelligence bulletin prepared by the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI alerted local colleagues to the ongoing threats posed by the Islamic State and other homegrown extremists. The official was not authorized to comment publicly.

 

The bulletins are frequently issued in advance of major U.S. holidays out of an abundance of caution and concern that operatives may exploit the timing to generate greater attention.

 

The warning comes as federal investigators have worked to disrupt a number of Islamic State-inspired plots, including a planned assault earlier this month on police officers in Boston. In that case, authorities fatally shot Usaamah Rahim as he allegedly planned to attack police with military-style knives.

 

Also this month, a New York suspect in a Islamic State-related terror investigation was arrested after attacking an FBI agent with a kitchen knife during a search of his home.

 

Fareed Mumuni, 21, was charged with attempted murder, after he emerged as a suspect in alleged plots to use pressure-cooker explosives and knives to attack police.

 

In a statement Friday following attacks in Tunisia, France and Kuwait, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson said local law enforcement was being encouraged to be "vigilant and prepared'' in preparation for July 4th celebrations.

 

"We will also adjust security measures, seen and unseen, as necessary to protect the American people,'' Johnson said. "We continue to encourage all Americans to attend public events and celebrate this country during this summer season, but always remain vigilant.''

 

The secretary also referred to last week's the deadly Charleston church shooting, saying that such "acts of mass violence will never divert, discourage or frighten us.''

 

"The alleged killer sought to divide us,'' Johnson said. "Instead, his actions appear to have had the opposite effect in South Carolina, where people of different races have come together to denounce the tragedy and mourn those killed.''